Monthly Archives: June 2016

Pain

Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows
When older relatives complain about their pains, show a little empathy, because new research suggests that as we age, we may all become more sensitive to pain.

(Source: The Medical News)

Copy below link into browser for article:
http://asn.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b0c6f0073384ed4a559ceb7bf&id=ebb3e433ac&e=c4ef3574bc

Decision Assist – free webinars

Are you caring for older people
who are approaching the end
of their lives?
Do you wonder if you are saying
and doing the right things?

If you answered yes to these questions, build your skills and confidence in having advance care planning conversations and providing quality palliative care when required.
Decision Assist is offering free 40 minute webinars designed to help you improve the care you provide for older people who are needing a palliative approach.
These webinars are ideal for people working in residential aged care facilities and community care settings.
The first and second webinars in the series have now been completed.
Undertreated Pain — effective pain management for people with dementia and Communication at the End of Life — meeting the needs of the family are now available for viewing.
VIEW ON DEMAND
For more information on the Decision Assist program go to decisionassist.org.au

24 hour telephone support is also available from palliative care specialists for GPs and aged care staff by phoning 1300 668 908.

________________________________________

Decision Assist is a program funded by the Australian Government.
Visit decisionassist.org.au for more information

Dying2Learn MOOC

Dying2Learn MOOC registrations now open
Registrations are now open for CareSearch’s free Massive Open Online course: Dying2Learn. The purpose of the MOOC is to facilitate social discussion about death and dying in Australia, and build community awareness of death as a normal process. The course content will be delivered in four learning modules over a four week period beginning on 27 June 2016. You can get more information and register here.

New Online Course

New course on death, dying and palliative care

Learning opportunity

The first massive open online course on death, dying and palliative care starts at the end of this month and it is open to anyone aged 18-100 who has a computer. It’s a course that is bound to make your dinner conversation more interesting. Read more

New course on death, dying and palliative care

Pain in Older adults

Pain
Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows
When older relatives complain about their pains, show a little empathy, because new research suggests that as we age, we may all become more sensitive to pain.

(Source: The Medical News)

PBS Changes

Changes to the Palliative Care Schedule on the PBS will take place on 1 June 2016. More information can be found here. If you have any concerns about the proposed changes, please email

philippa@palliativecare.org.au

Care Search Course

CareSearch are offering a Massive Online Open Course about death and dying. The purpose of the Dying2Learn MOOC is to build community awareness and foster social discussion about death and dying in Australia. Sign up here.

Discussion Starter

There have been over 1,000 downloads of the Dying to Talk Discussion Starter as well as over 4,000 printed copies distributed. If you haven’t seen it yet, download your copy at www.dyingtotalk.org.au To give feedback on how you have used the Discussion Starter, Email philippa@palliativecare.org.au

RACP end-of-life survey

Ranjana Srivastava provides interesting commentary about the results of the Royal Australian College of Physicians survey of over 1,500 physicians to identify their knowledge and practice of advance care planning and end-of-life care. She says that while doctors overwhelmingly agreed that discussing end of life care was important, only a minority actually translated the intention into action. Just under half of the physicians felt insufficiently trained to undertake one of the most consequential conversations in the doctor-patient relationship. Only 17% of physicians expressed confidence in knowing the end of life preferences of their patients. Read the full article here.

Essential elements for safe and high-quality end-of-life care

The Australian Commission into Safety and Quality in Health Care has produced an Infographic: Essential elements for safe and high-quality end-of-life care. (161kb pdf) This is a great summary of the elements in the National Consensus Statement.